BQF: Spring 2011

>> Friday, May 13, 2011

Amy's Creative Side

I think the blogger outage felled a lot of posting plans over the past 24 hours. I had hoped to get a Bloggers' Quilt Festival post up this morning, before I left for a weekend away, but was thwarted by technology. I'm back on my college campus for a swim/dive team reunion (I was a diver), and I'm snagging some internet time in the library before meeting up with former teammates for drinks and such.

My BQF choice may be familiar to regular blog readers and DQS10 participants, but I think it's the piece that best exemplifies my learning over the past 6 months. One of the things I love most about quilting is that I can always learn something new, and I've been pushing myself to tackle new techniques as well as tasks that intimidate me (circles!). In fact, I think it's safe to say that my 2011 mantra and goal has been "try new things." And DQS10 offered me the chance to make a pojagi panel for my partner.
I first encountered Pojagi through Victoria's lovely panels and followed her tutorial for making pojagi seams. This piece also represents my first use of shot cottons and cross weaves, which I fell for hard. I love the extra texture and interest the different warp and woof threads give, and I think these textiles really make the intentional simplicity of pojagi shine.

To me, this image conveys both softness and roughness. Pojagi was developed as a means of sewing work cloth -- cloth that would be used to wrap items, to carry things. As such, it should display a certain roughness, a testament akin to calloused hands or well-worn boots. But it also protects its contents from the elements or harm, and in that sense should exude softness as well. I like that even a hanging panel can speak to these qualities simultaneously, and I'm thinking of developing some challah covers using this method as I think it would convey the multiple purposes of of a challah cover, which covers and protects as well as beautifies and sacralizes.

15 comments:

floribunda... aka Julie May 13, 2011 at 5:27 PM  

beautiful photos! I need to go and read up on Pojagi now...

Elizabeth D. May 13, 2011 at 5:43 PM  

Oh my gosh, I love this! I just stumbled upon Pojagi at the library a few weeks ago, and this is a fantastic example in quilt form, wow!

Sarah Craig May 13, 2011 at 7:20 PM  

This is so gorgeous! I'm going to check out the tutorial right now - I can think of lots of uses for this technique....

piecemealquilts May 13, 2011 at 7:46 PM  

It's beautiful - I can't decide if I like the photo with the light shining through best, or if I prefer the close up that shows the texture of the fabrics and seams.

fallingforpieces May 14, 2011 at 8:15 AM  

I've been wanting to try this since I saw Victoria's too! Your's is even more inspiration!

Anonymous May 14, 2011 at 9:48 PM  

This would be perfect for a challah cover. Love the idea of it - go for it!

--Amy

stitchinpenny May 15, 2011 at 9:40 AM  

The very beautiful art is enhanced by your skill - love it.

Karen May 16, 2011 at 3:23 AM  

This is a beautiful panel. Fascinating work!

Sara May 16, 2011 at 10:24 AM  

Sweet pattern---gorgeous!

Janet May 16, 2011 at 11:49 PM  

This is only the second time I've seen Pojagi. I must find out more about it. Your quilt is lovely and very intriguing.

Sarcastic Quilter May 17, 2011 at 9:40 AM  

Wow, this is pretty cool and now I need to go see about this Pojagi. I'm intrigued.

Hollie May 17, 2011 at 8:43 PM  

I adore the pojagi technique and I love your example of it here. It's really wonderful. Doesn't hurt that green is my favorite color.

Sandra May 18, 2011 at 7:48 AM  

Very textural. Love the peaceful simplicity. Kudos.
Come see my entries: #210 repro cheddar orange stars-miniature and #214 antique applique garden delight

Carla May 21, 2011 at 9:16 AM  

I like that you are learning a lot this year. It's good to stretch our skins. I love the color and the texture of your entry. The photo make me want to touch it.

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